Food and Cannabis Elemental Analysis Part 2: Elemental Sample Prep for the Food and Agriculture Lab – Optimizing Your System for High Matrix Samples

Trace elemental analysis of foods and cannabis products is essential to ensure that products are suitable for consumption. The analysis of minerals and additional trace elements is also important because it provides labelling information that is required when these products are used as nutritional.

Agilent has presented a webinar series that focuses on elemental sample preparation to optimise high matrix samples in the food and agriculture testing space.

 

Part 1

We will cover the entire Agilent elemental portfolio. Each of the different instruments’ strengths and how they meet the challenges that food and cannabis labs have.

 

Part 2

We will focus on preparing your samples, including microwave digestion. We will also cover how to optimize your system for high matrix samples and a diverse sample set.

 

Part 3

We will put it all together, with running samples live in the lab. We will also share additional tips and tricks for obtaining excellent analytical results in these difficult matrices.

This focused information on spectroscopy applications is valuable for the emerging cannabis market as well as analysts who are seeking to master skills for food testing.

 

Speakers

Jenny Nelson, PhD
Application Scientist
Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Jenny Nelson received her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Cincinnati in 2007, and her MBA from Saint Mary’s College of California in 2011. Currently, Jenny is an Application Scientist for the Life Science and Chemical Analysis team at Agilent Technologies, joining in 2012 (with a step away in 2019). Jenny is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Viticulture and Enology at the University of California, Davis, since 2013. Jenny has been very active with AOAC and ASTM over the past eight years, serving on expert review panels, chairing committees, and volunteering to develop new methods needed by the industry. Jenny has extensive experience in operating and method development for Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES). Jenny has broad knowledge and experience in different speciation analysis for many sample matrices using GC-ICPMS and LC-ICPMS. As well as vast experience with sp-ICP-MS for many applications.

 

Greg Gilleland
Application Scientist
Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Greg began his spectroscopy career in 1987 in Colorado, working at a series of environmental labs. After 14 years working in the world of commercial environmental labs, he moved on to a spectroscopy instrument manufacturer where he performed service and sales functions over the course of 11 years. He has been with Agilent Technologies, Inc., since 2012 in the role of Application Scientist for ICP-OES, MP-AES and AA products.

 

Mark Kelinske
Application Scientist
Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Mark Kelinske is an Applications Chemist with Agilent Technologies, specializing in advanced ICP-MS and ICP-MS/MS techniques. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. Prior to Agilent, Mark was a senior research scientist and research group manager with Southern Research Institute in Birmingham, AL, where he focused on low-level analytical chemistry, method development, and research program management.

 

Chris Conklin
Atomic Spectroscopy Product Specialist
Agilent Technologies, Inc.

With a degree from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, Chris worked in, and lead, a quality control lab testing fine chemicals ranging from reagent grade to high purity. Over the course of 12 years in that role, Chris has run a variety of atomic elemental instruments and techniques including AA, ICP-OES, and ICP-MS. As a result, he has seen most of the periodic table in its elemental form and overcome the associated interferences. In 2018, Chris brought that knowledge and experience to his current role with Agilent as the Product Specialist for Atomic Spectroscopy supporting AA, MP-AES, and ICP-OES for the Eastern US.

 

Register and watch on demand >

 

Analysis of Terpenes in Cannabis Cultivars

This on-demand webinar is a comparison of headspace and SPME-arrow injection techniques for the analysis of terpenes in cannabis cultivars.

Prof. Dr. Götz Schlotterbeck
Dean Study Program Chemistry / Bioanalytics & Cell Biology and Analytical Chemistry FHNW (University of Applied Sciences and Arts), Muttenz, Switzerland

 

Watch on demand >

 

How to Select the Right Equipment for Cannabis Potency Testing

The cannabis and hemp markets are thriving around the world. South Africa is an emerging cannabis economy that is poised to become a major player in the global industry because of our favourable climate, the depth of our agriculture experience, and abundant viable land for farming. There is still a myriad of legislative and regulatory challenges to navigate and clarify, but great opportunities exist for businesses of all sizes to participate in the future growth of the cannabis sector.

The creates a need for cannabis testing and analysis, particularly potency testing. The high costs of setting up a cannabis and hemp testing laboratory and the wide array of choices can sometimes lead lab owners to make short-term, low-cost purchasing decisions. It is important to consider the long-term operations of the lab and define clear criteria for the choice of instrumentation.

 

Things to consider

Think in terms of ABLE methods: affordABLE, achievABLE, reliABLE, and repeatABLE when considering the instrument purchase. Other important decisions include the bench space in your lab and the footprint of the equipment, data processing, consumables, scientific consulting, education, and ongoing support. Finally, laboratories need to trust their instrumentation partner Chemetrix to support them with expertise and consultancy.

There is a bewildering range of testing equipment choices for the analysis of cannabinoids in cannabis and hemp products. How do you choose what’s right for you? Should you opt for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or do your needs align better with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS)?

Setting up a cannabis testing laboratory involves several significant decisions, and instrument selection for total cannabinoid analysis (potency testing) is one of the most important ones. Potency specifically refers to the amount of psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the sample, but other cannabinoids such as CBD, CBN, and others must be measured and reported as well.

 

Criteria for selecting instrumentation

The testing technology and equipment you select are dependent upon your commercial model, business goals, and type of laboratory set-up you have.

  1. If you are a start-up cannabis and hemp testing laboratory, grower, extractor, or manufacturer with small batch-processing needs, you require entry-level testing equipment that yields repeatable and reliable results. HPLC is the most widely used technology for this use case, and the Agilent 1220 Infinity II LC is ideal for your purpose. Capable of processing about 100 samples per day, it is perfect for routine testing. The Agilent 1220 Infinity II HPLC is a self-contained system with a small footprint and reliably tests 11 of the major cannabinoids.

    Agilent 1220 Infinity II LC
  2. An alternative to the 1220 system is the Agilent 1260 Infinity II HPLC. The 1260 platform is modular, flexible, upgradable, and can grow with your cannabis and hemp lab’s needs. High-throughput laboratories, cannabinoid researchers, forensic and criminalistic labs, and cultivar R&D may need to identify hundreds of cannabinoids and many other endogenous chemicals in cannabis and hemp. For these situations LC/MS is the answer. 
    Agilent 1260 Infinity II LC
  3. The Agilent Cary 630 FT-IR spectrometer is a type of equipment that is used for relatively simple testing of the four major cannabinoids with processed samples.

If your lab is pivoting to include cannabis potency testing in its service offering, speak to your Chemetrix sales representative who can advise if any upgrades or instrument acquisitions are required to ensure the lab can meet regulatory guidelines. If you’re newly venturing into this sector, Chemetrix is able to advise a complete solution that can ensure your lab can deliver results with a good return on investment from your analytical instrumentation.

Agilent Cary 630 FTIR Spectrometer

 

Explore Cannabis Potency Testing

To delve further into cannabis potency testing, read this article by Agilent Technologies that further explores the recommended testing technology and why they are best suited to the methodology required.

 

Looking for more information on Cannabis Potency Testing? Explore our Solutions Page >

 

Food and Cannabis Elemental Analysis Part 3: Elemental Analysis, Putting it All Together – Agilent 7850 ICP-OMS with MassHunter 5.1 Live Demo & Agilent 5900 ICP-OES with ICP Expert Live Demo

This will be a three week Food and Cannabis elemental analysis workshop. We will cover a lot of great information during these three weeks.

Part 3: We will put it all together, with running samples live in the lab.  We will also share additional tips and tricks on obtaining excellent analytical results in these difficult matrices.

 

Speakers

Jenny Nelson, PhD, Application Scientist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Jenny Nelson received her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Cincinnati in 2007, and her MBA from Saint Mary’s College of California in 2011. Currently, Jenny is an Application Scientist for the Life Science and Chemical Analysis team at Agilent Technologies, joining in 2012 (with a step away in 2019). Jenny is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Viticulture and Enology at the University of California, Davis, since 2013. Jenny has been very active with AOAC and ASTM over the past eight years, serving on expert review panels, chairing committees, and volunteering to develop new methods needed by the industry. Jenny has extensive experience in operating and method development for Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES). Jenny has broad knowledge and experience in different speciation analysis for many sample matrices using GC-ICPMS and LC-ICPMS. As well as vast experience with sp-ICP-MS for many applications.

Greg Gilleland, Application Scientist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Greg began his spectroscopy career in 1987 in Colorado, working at a series of environmental labs. After 14 years working in the world of commercial environmental labs, he moved on to a spectroscopy instrument manufacturer where he performed service and sales functions over the course of 11 years. He has been with Agilent Technologies, Inc., since 2012 in the role of Application Scientist for ICP-OES, MP-AES and AA products.

Mark Kelinske, Application Scientist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Mark Kelinske is an Applications Chemist with Agilent Technologies, specializing in advanced ICP-MS and ICP-MS/MS techniques. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. Prior to Agilent, Mark was a senior research scientist and research group manager with Southern Research Institute in Birmingham, AL, where he focused on low-level analytical chemistry, method development, and research program management.

Chris Conklin, Atomic Spectroscopy Product Specialist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

With a degree from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, Chris worked in, and lead, a quality control lab testing fine chemicals ranging from reagent grade to high purity. Over the course of 12 years in that role, Chris has run a variety of atomic elemental instruments and techniques including AA, ICP-OES, and ICP-MS. As a result, he has seen most of the periodic table in its elemental form and overcome the associated interferences. In 2018, Chris brought that knowledge and experience to his current role with Agilent as the Product Specialist for Atomic Spectroscopy supporting AA, MP-AES, and ICP-OES for the Eastern US.

 

Register Here >

 

Food and Cannabis Elemental Analysis Part 1: Elemental Workflows in the Food and Cannabis Lab

This will be a three week Food and Cannabis elemental analysis workshop. We will cover a lot of great information during these three weeks.

Part 1: We will cover the entire Agilent elemental portfolio. Each of the different instruments’ strengths and how they meet the challenges that food and cannabis labs have.

 

Speakers

Jenny Nelson, PhD, Application Scientist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Jenny Nelson received her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Cincinnati in 2007, and her MBA from Saint Mary’s College of California in 2011. Currently, Jenny is an Application Scientist for the Life Science and Chemical Analysis team at Agilent Technologies, joining in 2012 (with a step away in 2019). Jenny is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Viticulture and Enology at the University of California, Davis, since 2013. Jenny has been very active with AOAC and ASTM over the past eight years, serving on expert review panels, chairing committees, and volunteering to develop new methods needed by the industry. Jenny has extensive experience in operating and method development for Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES). Jenny has broad knowledge and experience in different speciation analysis for many sample matrices using GC-ICPMS and LC-ICPMS. As well as vast experience with sp-ICP-MS for many applications.

Greg Gilleland, Application Scientist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Greg began his spectroscopy career in 1987 in Colorado, working at a series of environmental labs. After 14 years working in the world of commercial environmental labs, he moved on to a spectroscopy instrument manufacturer where he performed service and sales functions over the course of 11 years. He has been with Agilent Technologies, Inc., since 2012 in the role of Application Scientist for ICP-OES, MP-AES and AA products.

Mark Kelinske, Application Scientist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Mark Kelinske is an Applications Chemist with Agilent Technologies, specializing in advanced ICP-MS and ICP-MS/MS techniques. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. Prior to Agilent, Mark was a senior research scientist and research group manager with Southern Research Institute in Birmingham, AL, where he focused on low-level analytical chemistry, method development, and research program management.

Chris Conklin, Atomic Spectroscopy Product Specialist, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

With a degree from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, Chris worked in, and lead, a quality control lab testing fine chemicals ranging from reagent grade to high purity. Over the course of 12 years in that role, Chris has run a variety of atomic elemental instruments and techniques including AA, ICP-OES, and ICP-MS. As a result, he has seen most of the periodic table in its elemental form and overcome the associated interferences. In 2018, Chris brought that knowledge and experience to his current role with Agilent as the Product Specialist for Atomic Spectroscopy supporting AA, MP-AES, and ICP-OES for the Eastern US.

 

Register Here >

 

 

Quick and Real-Time Determination of Potency in Cannabis Extracts using FTIR Spectroscopy

Cannabis products that are currently on the market consist of either dry material such as flower buds, concentrates such as shatter, budder, waxes, oils, extracts, and distillates, or infused products such as food and candies. The main active ingredients in these products are chemical compounds called cannabinoids, which provide either a medicinal or recreational effect to consumers. Of the many different cannabinoids that have been isolated from cannabis plants, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) compounds are generally those of greatest interest and the most prevalent found in commercial cannabis plants.

 

Register Here >